DevaCurl, EcoFab Beauty

My First DevaCurl Experience

Truth be told, I didn’t know what to expect. My hair used to have this beautiful natural beachy wave/curl and I wore my hair like that every single day. It’s pretty true you never really appreciate what you’ve got until it’s gone…or you almost kill it with heat and the wrong products.

I sought out DevaCurl after stalking their hashtag on Instagram, this is my favorite way to find local business too. The transformation pics were enough to convince me to reach out to DevaCurl. I wanted to fully commit to this process to bring out my natural curl again by starting the process fresh with the cut and then religiously using the products to get the full experience. DevaCurl was gracious enough to send me products so that I can share my true experience with my awesome readers (that’s you!). I found my stylist Jennifer Hoffner at Ryli Blue Salon after finding her on the DevaCurl Stylist Finder and then throughly vetting her via her Instagram. Through her captions and before and after photos, I booked the appointment.

After slightly dramatically wearing my extensions and documenting my hairstyles for a week (see here: A Week of Extensions – Before DevaCurl), I went to the Salon and got my first DevaCurl cut. What I didn’t realize is that not only was I getting a haircut but also a huge education on hair health for curly hair, along with some tips and tricks. Let me break down the haircut so you know what to expect for your first appointment:

The Consultation

I sat down and we talked about my hair, like a lot. We talked about how often I heat style, where my hair gets bulky, where it wants to part, where my cowlicks are; this was the most throughly I’ve ever had any hair stylist dive into my hair. Getting to know someones individual texture is like getting to know the ins and outs of a new friend. Jennifer gave me a rundown of how she views hair and why being a curly girl herself has inspired her to help and educate others on how to love their natural locks.

The Cut

When you show up for a DevaCurl cut they ask that you arrive with your hair naturally curly with little to no products so that they can see you natural texture. Since it was very rainy, my hair barely had a wave in it. As she began cutting (yes its a dry cut), she went curl by curl, about 1/2 inch sections at a time. She would walk back and look at it, and then go back in. She would shake my curls around and then cut a little bit more. Not one time did she cut my hair in a straight line like an average haircut would be. You can tell the difference in the shape in the before and after photos below.

The Wash

In comes product #1! First she used Low Poo Original, which is a lightly lathering cleanser. She only used about a quarter size amount and worked it into my scalp (along with an amazing head massage). For conditioning, she used One Condition Original and worked it from my ends up, but not putting on my scalp. In addition to both products smelling great, they are silicone and sulfate free.

This is SO IMPORTANT. Silicone’s are meant to make your hair shiny but they REPEL water. For curly hair, we need to absorb moisture and water so that our hair is throughly moisturized to avoid frizz. The more moisture your hair has inside of it reduces the amount that it seeks from the hair. Think of your frizzy pieces as reaching out from your hair looking for moisture in the air, thus creating frizz. Sulfates are detergents that act as a degreaser – sounds great right? WRONG. In addition to stripping away the grease buildup from products or not washing hair, it also strips away the natural oils that your scalp produces to keep your hair healthy.

The Style – Wet

After a cleanse and condition, it was time to style. I’ve never began the styling process while my hair is still sopping wet but that is the DevaCurl way! While my hair was still soaking wet, she started “ribboning” my hair and separating out and smoothing pieces so they all stayed together as my hair dried. This allows for less frizz and more uniform curls as opposed to all the strands separately curling on their own. This “ribboning” is meant to be done while still in the shower.

After all my curls were separated into uniform sections, it was time for product (note: my hair is still soaking wet). Jennifer had me flip my head over while she “glided” the products over all of the ribbons of hair. There’s no messing it all up and there’s no scrunching… yet. After she applied the Wave Maker cream, she followed it up with another product that I don’t remember what it was (help Jennifer!!). After both products were “glided” on, she took a microfiber towel (you can also use an old cotton t-shirt) and then scrunched all the extra water out of my hair. After doing this with my hair flipped upside down, and on both sides, I was ready for a dryer!

The Style – Dry

Now at this point, you can either let it air dry (reduced electricity = ecofab), OR you can diffuse it. She used both a normal diffuser that comes standard with most hair dryers. But then she also used the DevaFuser, which is a diffuser that is mean to more gently dry the roots of your curls. My hair was about 80% dry when I left the salon.

The Upkeep

Now to keep this up, here are the rules:

  • No heat
  • Only wash hair 2-3 times per week
  • Try hair plopping (solo post about this coming up)
  • Embrace the curls

All in all, I’m completely obsessed with my DevaCurl experience and I cannot wait to see my curls bounce back to their original state! Stay tuned for all the curly hair adventures!

BEFORE AND AFTER

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1 thought on “My First DevaCurl Experience”

  1. Pingback: Week 1 of DevaCurl

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